Blog Archives

Thursday 7 December China seminar: James A. Benn

Title: The Creation of a Tea Aesthetic in Tang Dynasty Verse

Speaker: McMaster University    James A. Benn

Venue: EYCKH 2 – 005

Time: 7 December 2017, 15:15-17:00

Abstract: The values associated with tea today— that it is natural, health- giving, detoxifying, spiritual, stimulating, refreshing, and so on— are not new concepts. We find them already in the poetry of the Tang dynasty (618-907). In tea poetry we can catch a glimpse of the cultural synergy created by literati, poets, and Buddhist monks gathering to share and construct new standards of connoisseurship and creativity, as well as to develop new themes and imagery. Surviving poems describe the color, aroma, and taste of the beverage; methods for preparing tea; the shape of teaware; settings for drinking tea; appreciation of the various aesthetic, medicinal, and psychoactive qualities of the beverage; as well as the world of tea growing, picking, and preparation.

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Upcoming talks this semester:

Dates Room Presenter Affiliation
7 December 2017 EYCKH2 – 005 James Benn McMaster University
13 December 2017 REUVENS 201a Rongdao Lai University of Southern California

 

23 Nov CHILL!: Rint Sybesma: VO-OV in Chinese languages and little v and Voice

CHILL!

Chinese linguistics in Leiden

 

Two more presentations to go:

 

23 November 2017 (Thursday) 15:15-16:30, Eyckhof 3/002

Rint SYBESMA (Leiden): VO-OV in Chinese languages and little v and Voice

 

VO-OV in Chinese languages and Voice and little v

 

abstract: In Chinese languages, both SVO and SOV surface orders are common. We see variation both within and between languages. Some languages, like Cantonese opt almost exclusively for SVO, while languages from the Wu and Min families tend to have SOV as soon as either the V or the O is more than just a bare V or a bare O. Mandarin, finally, shows both orders in several contexts. In this talk I try to find out whether we can understand what is going on if our analysis of these patterns involves Voice and little v, which may or may not be split or bundled all the time.

 

 

6 December 2017 (Wednesday) 15:15-16:30, Wijkplaats 4/005,

HU Han (Leiden): “To Er or not no Er? The changing er in the speech community of Beijing”

 

 

Note: the talk originally planned for 29 November has been cancelled.

17 Nov: Looking for a place to bathe: lecture & museum visit

LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO BATHE: missed opportunities of anchoring Manchu origins in Kangxi’s Overview Maps of the Imperial Territories.

Throughout history, governments have (mis)used maps to build identity among their subjects. For Manchu khans, anchoring Manchu identity has been a struggle from the beginning. In fact, ‘being Manchu’ was a construct that only started to appear in written sources since the 1620s. The fourth khan of the Manchus, Kangxi (r.1661-1722), started to map his empire, resulting in 41 individual sheets. These Overview Maps of the Imperial Territories (Huangyu quanlan tu) presented a good opportunity of showing his people how far they had come since his great grandfather Nurhaci had attacked the Ming in 1618. Not unimportant, this project gave him the canvas to map the narrative surrounding the origin the Manchu royal lineage and its subjects, which started with three maidens wanting to bathe. The question whether the Overview maps succeeded in anchoring Manchu origins is at the centre of this lecture.

Speaker: Fresco Sam-Sin (Leiden University / Research Center for Material Culture)
followed by visit to the Mapping Asia gallery at Volkenkunde.

Timing:

14:00: Lecture in Arsenaal, room 001
15:00: Walk to Mapping Asia gallery
16:36: end, followed by drinks?

https://www.eventbrite.nl/e/tickets-lecture-and-museum-visit-looking-for-a-place-to-bathe-39722003582

 

 

Chinese films at the Leiden International Film Festival

Film Program:

Monday 30th October 16:30, Our Time Will Come

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/our-time-will-come/2899

 

Tuesday 31st October 14:00, Our Time Will Come

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/our-time-will-come/2900

 

Tuesday 31st October 16:45 Big Fish & Begonia

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/big-fishbegonia/2577

 

Wednesday 1st November 13:45, Operation Mekong

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/operation-mekong/2897

 

Wednesday 1st November 18:45, Duckweed

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/duckweed/2869

 

Thursday 2nd  November 13:45, Duckweed

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/duckweed/2870

 

Saturday 4th November  16:15, Operation Mekong

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/operation-mekong/2898

 

Sunday 5th November 12:00, Big Fish & Begonia

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/big-fishbegonia/2578

 

Sunday 5th November 21:30, Our Time Will Come

https://www.liff.nl/Programma/Movie/our-time-will-come/2901

 

 

15 Nov China Seminar: Daniel Stumm

Lecture

Philologists, forgers and disciples: The complexities of authorship in 18th-century China

Date
15 November 2017
Time
15:15 – 17:00  hrs.
Series
China Seminar
Address
Van Wijkplaats 4
2311 BX Leiden
Room
005

In the 18th century, the topic of authorship began to dominate scholarly discussions in China. Every text had to be assigned to one author; any other mode of textual production was regarded as problematic. Especially early Chinese texts, however, did not fit into this model, as it was unclear who had written them. This talk addresses the manifold consequences that this incongruity generated in the late 18th century. Philologists saw the received text as unreliable, which threatened the authority of many works. Most scholars countered this tendency to doubt by dissecting received texts in order to separate authentic passages from later additions. A close reading of the arguments employed shows that a strong moralist bias influenced such research, leading Qing scholars to especially doubt the authenticity of passages they deemed morally dubious. Claims of inauthenticity thus functioned as a particularly effective way to imprint 18th-century values into the classics.

1 Nov China Seminar: Ching-Ling Wang on the Haiyu tu (1736)

Lecture

On a Newly Discovered See Fish Album (Haiyu tu, 1736) and the Formation of Knowledge in the 18th Century China

  • Dr. Ching-Ling Wang
Date
1 November 2017
Time
15:15 – 17:00  hrs.
Series
China Seminar
Address
Van Wijkplaats 2
2311 BX Leiden
Room
006

This lecture introduces a special newly discovered See Fish Album (Haiyu tu, 1736), composed by a local officer in Guandong in the collection of Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Illustrated books or albums of animals, birds, plants, fish, foreigners and aboriginals have emerged in the 18th century China. Such albums or books were commissioned to be made in the court and as well in local by the educated elites. The speaker will survey this album by putting into its pictorial context and historical context, through a detailed exam of the making of the See Fish Album to discuss issues of the formation and transmission of knowledge in the 18th century China.

1 Nov CHILL! (Chinese linguistics in Leiden): Joren Pronk

CHILL!

Chinese Linguistics in Leiden

1 November 2017, 15:15-16:30, Wijkplaats 4/005

Joren Pronk (Leiden):

A corpus-based description of kong2 in Taiwanese Southern Mǐn

The morpheme kong2 is widely used in Taiwanese Southern Mǐn, a Sinitic language spoken on the island of Taiwan. In this talk I will present the different functions of the use of kong2 that were found in my corpus, a discussion between four speakers aired on the radio by GreenPeace Broadcasting Station on August 13, 2016.

 

forthcoming:

23 November 2017 [Thursday!! Location: to be announced]

Rint Sybesma (Leiden): “VO-OV and Voice and little v

 

29 November 2017

Liu Min (Leiden): “Processing of tone and intonation in Mandarin”

 

6 December 2017

Hu Han (Leiden) (title to be announced)

 

If you have questions, comments, suggestions: write to r.p.e.sybesma@hum.leidenuniv.nl

 

18 Oct China Seminar: Christopher Rea

China Seminar: Of Spongers, Sharpers, and Cannibal Eunuchs:  The Swindle Story around the World

Speaker: University of British Columbia    Christopher Rea

Venue: VRIESH2 – 004      (all are welcome)

Time: 18 October 2017, 15:15-17:00

Abstract: Why do collections of swindle stories appear at certain times and places? In China, for example, the swindle story has experienced bursts of popularity during the late Ming, the early Republican era, the early Mao era, and during the last 20 years. And comparable works exist around the world. What, for example, do Zhang Yingyu’s Book of Swindles(Ming China, 1617),Richard King’s The New Cheats of London Exposed (Georgian England, 1792), and P.T. Barnum’s The Humbugs of the World (Reconstruction-era United States, 1867) have in common—and how do they differ? Swindle stories, clearly, serve a double purpose: they teach techniques for navigating perilous social environments, and they entertain. But theirs authors tend to frame these narratives within a questionable claim: that ours is an age of unprecedented peril. Focusing on the example of China, this talk will highlight one thread running through literary history: connoisseurship of the swindler’s ingenuity.

 

11 October CHILL (Chinese Linguistics in Leiden): Lin Jing

CHILL!

Chinese Linguistics in Leiden

 

11 October 2017 15:15-16:30, Wijkplaats 4/005

 

Lin Jing (Leiden):

Do speakers really benefit from linguistic markedness in hypothetical reasoning?

 

Abstract Many languages make use of conditional connectives in hypothetical sentences, like if in English. But if can also be used temporally, in which case it is interchangeable with temporal connectives like when. Such semantic ambiguity of conditional connectives is not found in Mandarin. Rúguǒ, for instance, only expresses hypotheticality. However, as I will show in this talk, speakers do not appear to benefit from the unique markedness of hypotheticality in Mandarin, as the presence of rúguǒ does not seem to help them reach a hypothetical reasoning pattern. I will present both accuracy and reaction time data, and discuss possible explanations for the results.

 

forthcoming:

1 November 2017

Joren Pronk (Leiden): “A corpus-based description of kong2 in Taiwanese Southern Mǐn”

 

23 November 2017 [Thursday!! Location: to be announced]

Rint Sybesma (Leiden): “VO-OV and Voice and little v

 

29 November 2017

Liu Min (Leiden): “Processing of tone and intonation in Mandarin”

 

6 December 2017

Hu Han (Leiden) (title to be announced)

 

If you have questions, comments, suggestions: write to r.p.e.sybesma@hum.leidenuniv.nl

 

27 September CHILL! Chinese Linguistics in Leiden: Liu Zenghui

CHILL!

Chinese Linguistics in Leiden

 

Program for Fall 2017

 

All welcome!

 

All lectures Wednesdays 15:15-16:30, Wijkplaats 4 /005, unless indicated otherwise

All lectures in English, unless indicated otherwise

 

27 September 2017

Liu Zenghui (Utrecht): “The development of prosodic focus-marking in early bilinguals’ L2: A study of the Mandarin of Bai-Mandarin bilingual children”

 

abstract This presentation reports about investigations into the developmental trajectory of prosodic focus-marking in Mandarin produced by Bai-Mandarin bilingual children (age 6-13 yoa), in comparison with that of monolingual Mandarin speaking peers. The research concerns Subject-Verb-Object sentences, which were elicited with varied focus conditions in a semi-spontaneous setting. The results show similarities and differences in the acquisition rate and route in Bai-Mandarin early bilingual children’s L2 and that in monolingual Mandarin-speaking peers’ L1.

 

28 September 2017

Two PhD defenses in Chinese linguistics (Senaatskamer, Academy building):

10:00  Zou Ting will be defending her dissertation, entitled: “Production and perception of tones by Dutch learners of Mandarin”

13:45  lu Man will be defending her dissertation, entitled: “The morpho-syntax of aspect in Xiāng Chinese”

 

11 October 2017

Lin Jing (Leiden): “Do speakers really benefit from linguistic markedness in hypothetical reasoning?”

 

1 November 2017

Joren Pronk (Leiden): “A corpus-based description of kong2 in Taiwanese Southern Mǐn”

 

23 November 2017 [Thursday!! Location: to be announced]

Rint Sybesma (Leiden): “VO-OV and Voice and little v

 

29 November 2017

Liu Min (Leiden): “Processing of tone and intonation in Mandarin”

 

6 December 2017

Hu Han (Leiden) (title to be announced)

 

If you have questions, comments, suggestions: write to r.p.e.sybesma@hum.leidenuniv.nl