Blog Archives

CHINA SEMINAR | 6 MARCH 2013 | Anne-Christine Trémon| Lineage globalization and village localization in the making of Shenzhen

Lineage globalization and village localization in the making of Shenzhen

Speaker:  Dr. Anne-Christine Trémon
Expertise:  Chinese diaspora, Shenzhen, urban policies, heritage, kinship
Date and time:  Wednesday, 6 March 2013, 15.15-17.00
Venue:  Arsenaal building, 014

Language:  English

Abstract:

In my ongoing research project, I examine the transformations that have occurred over the past decades in a former village in Northern Shenzhen with the aim of understanding ‘Chinese globalization’ from below. The purpose of my project is to gain understanding of the transformations that affect the ‘lineage-village complex’. These transformations are the product of processes that unfold at different levels, and they in turn produce social entities and linkages at local and global scales. Global processes – the making of the Shenzhen special economic zone and the reconnections with the diaspora since the onset of the ‘reform and opening’ – have led to the physical disappearance of the village and, simultaneously, to the revival of the lineage.

My two main interests are the changing role of diasporic connexions and the making of a ‘native villager’ (yuancunmin) legal category. Song Yuan Sha was historically an almost single-lineage village; more than 90% of its inhabitants claim to descend from the same founding ancestor. This village of barely 3000 inhabitants in the late 1970s has today a population of approximately 60000 residents; from an emigrant village, it has been turned into an immigrant neighbourhood in a megacity of more than 10 millions.

In 2004, the village went through a process of urbanization whereby the former villagers were turned into urban residents. However, the village community still exists, and being a native villager (yuancunmin) has taken on increased importance as a result of the transformations of the collective economy. As stronger emphasis is being put on local membership, the importance of ties to the Overseas relatives in the diaspora seems to be decreasing. Yet social, economic and symbolic ties to the diaspora still contribute to the perpetuation of the lineage as a social entity. Indeed, the financial contributions of the diaspora have been instrumental in safeguarding the founding ancestor’s tomb from destruction by urban redevelopment; the villagers built a monumental mausoleum and succeeded in registering it as heritage.

I will argue that these changes reveal a process of territorialisation that comes along with both village localization and lineage globalization.

 

About Anne-Christine Trémon:

“My research examines Chinese globalization and the Chinese diaspora in an anthropological and historical perspective. I conducted fieldwork among the Chinese in French Polynesia for my doctoral thesis which was published as a book (Chinois en Polynésie française. Migration, métissage, diaspora, Société d’ethnologie, Nanterre, 2010). During my postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute of ethnology of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (2005-2006), I studied the making of a Hakka cultural hall (kejiawenhuaguan); I have recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Gradhiva on heritage and museums in China and TaIwan. More recently, I have led a team research group on urban policies toward Chinese migrants in Paris (2010-2012). In the summer 2011, I started carrying out fieldwork in Shenzhen, in one of the villages of origin of the French Polynesian Chinese. I have earned an Eurias fellowship at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study to further this project.”

 

 

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lectures atLeidenUniversity, please visit the blog at

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(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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CHINA SEMINAR | 13 FEBRUARY 2013 | Lennert Gesterkamp | Is ‘Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains’ a Daoist Inner Landscape Painting?

Is Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains a Daoist Inner Landscape Painting?
Speaker: Dr. Lennert Gesterkamp (Independent scholar)
Expertise: Chinese art history, Daoism

Date and time: Wednesday, 13 February 2013, 15.15-17.00
Venue: Arsenaal building, 001
Language: English
Abstract: Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains《富春山居圖》is probably the most famous landscape painting in Chinese history. There are different views on what the painting depicts, and how it should be interpreted: does it depict the mountain resort of the painter, Huang Gongwang 黄公望 (1269-1354) and the scenery of the Fuchun mountains, south of Hangzhou? Or is it a typically auspicious location, based on principles Chinese geomancy?
What could be the theme of Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains? And furthermore: do Chinese landscape paintings have to depict a theme? Can the painter not simply give expression to his individual feelings, or for example depict the atmosphere of a certain season as often alluded to in many other paintings?
This presentation takes the social identity and background of the painter and the recipient as a starting point, and investigates the possible links with inner alchemy, and the Inner Landscape Paintings (neijing tu 內境圖, or內景圖, 內經圖) of this tradition.

Lennert Gesterkamp received his PhD from Leiden University in 2008, after graduate work at Leiden and SOAS, London. He was a post-doc at the Academia Sinica, Taibei, and most recently at Zhejiang University, Hangzhou. He is i.a. the author of The Heavenly Court: Daoist Temple Painting in China, 1200-1400, and has published several articles in Chinese on landscape painting and temple painting.

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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog
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lectures at Leiden University, please visit the blog at
http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/
or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer
(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

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Lecture: Money along the Silk Road

Monday 7 January 2013 | Lecture by Helen Wang (British Museum)
“Money along the Silk Road”
Time: 12.00 – 13.00 hrs

Venue: Lipsius building 228 (WSD complex, Leiden University)

CHINA SEMINAR | 05 DECEMBER 2012 | Barend ter Haar | Where Are China’s Witches?

CHINA SEMINAR | 05 DECEMBER 2012 | Barend ter Haar | Where Are China’s Witches?

 

   

 

 

Where Are China’s Witches?

Speaker:  Professor Barend ter Haar (LIAS, China Studies)
Expertise: premodern Chinese history

Date and time:  Wednesday, 5 December 2012, 3pm sharp(!)
Venue:  Arsenaal building, room 001
Language:  English

Abstract:
The accusation of being a witch or magician does not necessarily mean that someone really practiced witchcraft or magic. In this talk I treat it mainly as a claim intended to separate people from the social networks within which they were relatively secure, usually in order to explain unusual phenomena (such as weather disasters), or even completely instrumentally in order to fight out local conflicts. The talk deals with the curious phenomenon that we have massive information on witch hunts in the West, collected principally by historians, but also in many former colonies, collected mostly by anthropologists and sometimes by historians. This is indeed a substantial field of study, also in German thanks to the rich archives that are still extant. One would expect similar phenomena in China, Korea and Japan, but in the secondary literature research on this topic is almost absent. Over the last few years I have tried to gather more information, also in the primary literature. In my talk I will discuss my findings until now, develop a model that could also be applied to the twentieth century, and suggest why witchhunts as a social phenomenon are relatively rare in traditional China, though by no means absent.

Speaker’s resume:

Professor ter Haar obtained his PhD from Leiden University in 1990. He worked in Leiden from 1984 until 1994, then left for Heidelberg. In 2000 he returned as chair of Chinese history. He was recently appointed to the Shaw Professorship of Chinese in the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford with effect from January 2013.

 

He published various books and articles on Chinese cultural and religious history, details of which can be found at his personal website.
E-mailb.ter.haar@hum.leidenuniv.nl
Website:  http://www.leidenuniv.nl/personal/~haarbjter/

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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog

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For more information about China-related activities and

lectures at Leiden University, please visit the blog at

http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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Public Lecture: 23 November: Prof. Lisa Claypool

PUBLIC LECTURE

“Boundary Forms: Calligraphy and the City at the 2010 Shanghai World Expo”

by

Professor Lisa Claypool

(University of Alberta)

Lipsius Building, Room 227

16.00-18.00

Friday, 23 November 2012

A lecture sponsored by The Hulsewé-Wazniewski Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and Research in the Archaeology, Art, and Material Culture of China

ALL ARE WELCOME

20 November: Just War Theory: On Classifications of Warfare in Early Chinese Texts

20 November 2012

Lecture: Just War Theory: On Classifications of Warfare in Early Chinese Texts

by Paul van Els (LIAS, China Studies)

Time: 2 pm
Location: Leiden University, Matthias de Vrieshof 4, 004A

For more information, please visit the website 

CHINA SEMINAR | 24 OCTOBER 2012 | Russ Glenn | Chinese Oil Security: Prospects for Conflict and Cooperation

 

Chinese Oil Security: Prospects for Conflict and Cooperation
Speaker: Dr. Russ Glenn (LIAS )
Expertise: International Relations, Sino-US relations, Energy Security

Date and time: Wednesday, 24 October 2012, 15.15-17.00
Venue: Arsenaal building, 001 (TBC)
Language: English
Abstract: Will China’s rapid economic growth and accompanying oil needs force conflict with the United States? As the world’s largest consumers of oil, these two states are seemingly locked in a zero-sum battle for a valuable and dwindling resource. This often-presented conflictual view is false. Instead of being a catalyst for great-power conflict, oil is in fact a useful, timely, and already-functioning motivator of strategic partnership between the United States and China. For both the United States and China, the benefits of cooperation in the mutually reinforcing oil and economic systems are obvious and relatively easy to access, while revisionism is prohibitively risky and costly. These realities form the “Oil Peace Paradox”: oil is central to the needs and aspirations of both states, but conflict over it prohibits the very futures they need to create.
Dr. Glenn is currently lecturer in Chinese Studies at Leiden University, focusing on Chinese foreign policy and politics. He recently completed PhD student at the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Faculty at the University of Cambridge. He is also a contributing analyst for Wikistrat on the Asia-Pacific and Energy Security Desks.

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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog
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lectures at Leiden University, please visit the blog at
http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/
or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer
(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

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China Seminar: 25 September

In the afternoon of Tuesday 25 September, the Chinese studies program at Leiden University has the pleasure of welcoming two eminent scholars in Chinese poetry to meet with local students and staff for an informal discussion of current trends in literary studies in China, with speciall attention to their own research. They are Prof Wu Sijing, a specialist of modern poetry, and Prof Zhao Minli, a specialist of classical poetry. Wu and Zhao are both affiliated with Capital Normal University, a national center for the study of poetry, with major dedicated project funding from the MoE, and have published and edited widely in the field. Their CVs are attached below.

All are welcome.

SPEAKERS: Profs Wu Sijing and Zhao Minli, Capital Normal University, Beijing
VENUE: Matthias de Vrieshof 4 – 008-A (Witte Singel – WSD-campus)
TIME: Tue 25 Sept, 3:15 pm
LANGUAGE: Chinese

吴思敬简介

吴思敬,北京市人。出生于1942年11月16日。首都师范大学文学院教授、博士生导师,首都师范大学中国诗歌研究中心副主任,《诗探索》主编,中国当代文学研究会副会长,中国诗歌学会副会长。2001年8月获得中华人民共和国国务院颁发的“政府特殊津贴”。2001年9月获得中华人民共和国教育部授予的“全国优秀教师”称号。长期从事诗歌理论研究和中国当代诗歌批评工作。主要学术著作有: 《诗歌基本原理》、《心理诗学》、《诗歌鉴赏心理》、《写作心理能力的培养 》、《冲撞中的精灵》、《诗学沉思录》、《走向哲学的诗》、《自由的精灵与沉重的翅膀》、《文学原理》(主编)、《中国新诗总系·诗论卷》(主编)、《文学评论的写作》(合著)、《文章学》(合著)、《中国诗歌通史·当代卷》(主编)等。

赵敏俐简介

赵敏俐,1954年生,汉族,内蒙赤峰人,文学博士,教授,博士生导师。从事先秦两汉文学与文化、中国古代诗歌的教学与科研工作。现任首都师范大学中国古代文学国家重点学科负责人,教育部省属高校人文社会科学重点研究基地中国诗歌研究中心主任。1997年被评为北京市跨世纪人才,1999年被评为首都师范大学首批中青年学科带头人,2005年被评为北京市首批创新拔尖人才,2006年被评为北京市高等学校教学名师,2008年被评为首批北京市高校高层次人才。国务院政府特殊津贴获得者。主要学术著作有:《两汉诗歌研究》、《文学传统与中国文化》、《燃起智慧的火种——中国古代教育》、《汉代诗歌史论》、《中国古代歌诗研究——从〈诗经〉到元曲的艺术生产史》、《文学研究方法论讲义》、《汉代乐府制度与歌诗研究》、《中国诗歌通史·汉代卷》、《中国诗歌通史》(主编)等。

Tentoonstelling Blue Prints, Rotterdam

Prompts & Triggers
Blueprints (2012)
Qiu Zhijie

blueprints picture 

Thursday 28 June 2012 – Sunday 19
Augustus 2012

Opening: Thursday 28 June 2012, from 5 to 8pm
View the artist at work from 25 – 28 June 2012, 12
– 6pm

To schedule a special conversation time with Qiu Zhijie during this time,
please RSVP: 
info@wdw.nl.

Artist Qiu Zhijie (邱志杰; b. 1969, Fujian
Province, China) draws from major political and historical narratives to
produce large-scale ink-based maps. From Confucianism to Enlightenment, Qiu
Zhijie charts new paths, centers, nodes and relationships, scrutinizing the
mutable boundaries that outline histories of world thought. The concepts on
which Qiu Zhijie bases the series of mappings of the contemporary world are
summarized in the following maps: Map of
21st century; Map of Utopia; Map of Total Art; Map of Chinese History; Map of
Nanjing Yangzi River
and Map of
Spirit Renew
. These maps also inform the concept of the 9th
Shanghai Biennale, with ‘Reactivation’ as its central theme, opening on the
October 1st

 More information on the website: http://www.wdw.nl/nl/event/prompts-triggers-qiu-zhijie/ 

Chinees voor alumni!

Op veler verzoek!

“Chinees voor alumni”

Speciaal voor alumni van de opleiding Chinees (TCC/CS; “Sinologie”) van de Universiteit Leiden, die na hun afstuderen niet of weinig met hun Chinees doen/gedaan hebben en hun kennis van die taal graag op een rustige en leuke manier willen bijspijkeren organiseren het Confucius Instituut en het Academische Talen Centrum van Universiteit Leiden een opfriscursus.

Voor meer informatie (en om een idee te krijgen van het multimediale lesmateriaal): 
http://www.hum.leidenuniv.nl/talencentrum/overige-talen/chinees-voor-alumni.html