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Barend ter Haar Farewell Symposium: Writing and Literacy in early traditional China

Barend ter Haar Farewell Symposium

 

Writing and literacy in early traditional China

 

date: 21 June 2013

place: Lipsius 148

 

Program

10:30  Welcome

10:45-11:30  Adam Smith: “Literacy in the Shang”

11:30-12:15  Paul van Els: “The Master said… or did he?”

lunch

13:45-14:30  Imre Galambos: “Literacy in Dunhuang material”

14:30-15:15  Dirk Meyer: “The Gùmìng 顧命 (Testimonial charge) and the production of memory in Warring States politico-philosophical debate”

tea

15:45-16:45  Valerie Hansen: “Writing and literacy on the silk road”

16:45-17:30  Barend ter Haar: “Some comments on historical issues around writing”

 

drinks in the LAK foyer

 

This symposium has been made possible thanks to financial support from:

LUF/Romboutsfonds, AMT, LIAS and Opleiding Chinastudies

Friday 24 May: lecture by Venerable Dr. Yifa: “The Current State of Buddhism in China”

The Current State of Buddhism in China

A lecture by Venerable Dr. Yifa

Friday 24 May, 15-16.30

East Asian Library, Green Room (http://www.leidenuniv.nl/loc/index.html?lang=nl&loc=7)

Venerable Dr. Yifa, Ph.D (依法法師)(b. 1959) is a Taiwanese Buddhist nun, scholar, and writer. Ordained by the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order in 1979, Yifa holds a law degree from the Taiwan National University, a masters in comparative philosophy from the University of Hawaii and a doctorate in religious studies from Yale University. She served as a department head and dean of University of the West during her tenure. She is the current director of the Woodenfish Program for college students.

Since 2006, Venerable Yifa and others have published translations of the Heart Sutra, Diamond Sutra, Ksitigarbha Sutra, and Amitabha Sutra. Venerable Yifa and Fo Guang Shan seek to make Buddhist practice relevant to contemporary life. She lives at Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, California.

CHINA SEMINAR | 22 MAY 2013 | Jeroen Wiedenhof | Chao’s Grammar: Historic or historical?

        

Chao’s Grammar: Historic or historical?

Speaker: Dr Jeroen Wiedenhof (LIAS, LUCL)
Expertise:  Chinese linguistics, syntax and semantics, evolutionary linguistics, writing systems, language teaching (Mandarin, Classical Chinese)
Date and time:  Wednesday, 22 May 2013, 15.15-17.00
Venue:  Arsenaal building, 014

Language:  English

Yuen Ren Chao’s 趙元任 Grammar of spoken Chinese represents a milestone in Chinese linguistics. At the time of its publication in 1968, it brought a wealth of new data and insightful analyses to the field. But in 2013, how relevant can this inventory of the language still be? In this lecture, I will consider the work’s windfalls and pitfalls for linguistic research, for linguistics teaching, and for language pedagogy.

This China Seminar session serves as a try-out for my contribution at the 25th annual North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics <http://naccl25.net>. I am eager to hear your suggestions about its contents, and about my presentation. The talk is intended to be of interest for students, fellow linguists and fellow language teachers.

Students: teaching programs are always evolving. A recent example is the launch of a Chinese Linguistics track as part of the Leiden University MA program in Linguistics. Within this track, a course on the History of Chinese linguistics is in the making. The subject of this talk would have a home in such a course: I am interested in your comments.

Linguists: an excellent grammar outlives the language it describes. Since Chao’s Grammar, no treatment of Mandarin has approached his work in scope and detail. But the language has changed, reflecting China’s social transformations. In keeping with the spirit of Chao’s documentation of spoken norms, I will present clear instances of recent linguistic change.

Language teachers: close ties between language teaching and linguistics were a hallmark of Chao’s work. I will discuss the current relevance of this relationship for curriculum planning in second-language acquisition, especially for languages with non-alphabetic scripts.

About the speaker: Jeroen Wiedenhof is a linguist and language teacher at Leiden University, with joint appointments at the institutes for area studies and for linguistics (LIAS, LUCL). He was trained as a sinologist in Leiden and Peking. Apart from his work in Chinese and general linguistics, he has published on the origin and evolution of language in humankind.

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http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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China Seminar: 13 MAY 2013 | Dingping Guo | The Changing Patterns of Communist Party-State Relations in China

The Changing Patterns of Communist Party-State Relations in China: Comparative Perspective

Speaker:  Prof. Dingping GUO (Fudan University and Confucius Institute Nottingham University)
Date and time:  Monday 13 May 2013, 16.00-17.00
Venue:  Lipsius 235c

Language:  English

 

Summary: Although many remarkable changes have taken place in Chinese politics since the reform and opening policies were adopted in the late 1970s, and most of scholars on Chinese politics have studied all different kinds of political reforms and political developments during the past three decades, almost all China experts take it for granted that the Communist Party-state resists any changes. I will try to explore and explain the different patterns of relations between Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and Chinese state by analyzing the legislative developments and changing relations between the CCP and People’s Congresses (PCs). While many scholars have made great contributions to the studies of Party-government relations in China, I tend to regard the CCP-PCs relation as a more important and promising field of study when we discuss the Communist party-state relations in contemporary China. The whole lecture will include the following four parts. First, a new theoretical framework of analysis will be introduced based on literature review. Second, the legislative developments and changing patterns of Communist party-state relations will be analyzed in my theoretical framework. Third, the new pattern of Communist party-state relations emerging since the early 1990s in today’s China will be studied and especially the recent developments about the increasing number of Communist party secretaries who serve as Local People’s Congress (LPC) standing committee chairs will be described and discussed in detail. In concluding remarks, after summarizing the main points, I will discuss the implications of the changing patterns of Communist party-state relations for the future state-building and democratization in China from comparative perspective.

Dingping Guo is professor of political science in School of International Relations and Public Affairs of Fudan University, concurrently serving as Chinese Director of the Confucius Institute at the University of Nottingham. Before joining Nottingham, he was Vice-Dean of the Institute of International Studies (2009-2012); Director of the Center for Japanese Studies (2008-2012) at Fudan University. His research interests focus on comparative politics, especially democracy and political development. His publications include books such as Culture and Democracy (editor, Fudan Political Science Series No. 8, Shanghai People’s Press, 2010), Studies of Political and Diplomatic Transformation in Japan (editor, Fudan University Press, 2010), The Community-Building in East Asia: Theory and Practice. (editor, Fudan University Press, 2008), Governance and Democracy in Shanghai (Chongqing Press,2005), A Study of the Democratic Transition in Korea (Beijing: Social Science Press of China, 2000), Political Parties and Government (Hangzhou: Zhejiang People’s Press, 1998), Pluralist Politics (Hong Kong: Joint Publishing House,1994), and many articles and essays in Chinese, English and Japanese.

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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog

receive an abstract of each talk one week in advance.

For more information about China-related activities and

lectures atLeidenUniversity, please visit the blog at

http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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CHINA SEMINAR | 24 APRIL 2013 | Kai Filipiak| Ming Martial Arts: Characteristic Features and Problems of Research

 

Ming Martial Arts: Characteristic Features and Problems of Research

Speaker:  Dr. Kai Filipiak (University of Leipzig)
Expertise:  Political and Social History of Late Imperial China, Military History, Chinese Martial Arts
Date and time:  Wednesday, 24 April 2013, 15.15-17.00
Venue:  Arsenaal building, East Asian Library, Green Room

Language:  English

Abstract: The paper deals with characteristic features of martial arts during the Ming dynasty. Starting from the question of what martial arts is or seems to be, the paper provides an introduction into types of sources, discusses important trends of martial arts development during the Ming dynasty and explains the social origins of martial arts practice. It will be shown that the development is characterized by aspects of differentiation, specialization, and regionalization of martial arts. Using the example of the military, it can be demonstrated that the practice of martial arts was closely related to its purpose that defined the performance. Finally, the paper presents different social groups practicing martial arts for different reasons. The last section will fix some problems in Ming martial arts research today.

Dr. Filipiak obtained his Ph.D. from Leipzig University. He has been a lecturer at Leipzig University, Philips University (Marburg), and a visiting researcher at  and is currently also visiting professor at People’s University in Beijing as well as senior lecturer in  Chinese Studies at Leipzig University. His publications include a number of articles on Chinese military history.

This seminar is sponsored by Stichting Shilin, Leiden University Journal of Young Sinology.

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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog

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For more information about China-related activities and

lectures atLeidenUniversity, please visit the blog at

http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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Lecture: Ming Princes and the Ming Polity, by J. Kerlouégan

A Eurasian Empires Event:

Lecture by J. Kerlouégan, “Ming Princes and the Ming Polity”

Wednesday 10 April, 17.00-19.00

Venue: room 148 in the Lipsius building

More information: http://www.hum.leiden.edu/lias/highlights/10-april-eurasian-empires-event.html

China seminar: correction

China Seminar will be on Wednesday 3 April! The original announcement has now been corrected.

CHINA SEMINAR | 3 APRIL 2013 | Rogier Creemers | Neo-liberal Leninism with Chinese characteristics: An epistemology of China’s media policy

 

 

Neo-liberal Leninism with Chinese characteristics: an epistemology of China’s media policy

Speaker:  Dr. Rogier Creemers

Expertise: Chinese media and communications law and policy

Date and time:  Wednesday, 3 April 2013, 15.15-17.00
Venue:  Arsenaal building, 014

Language:  English

Abstract: “In this presentation, I will provide an overview of the evolution of media policy in China throughout the 20th Century, and how it is connected to wider political, social and economic trends. I will argue that media have been primarily conceived in an instrumental manner, in order to achieve the objectives of self-strengthening and development, China’s core political mission since the mid-19th Century.

This has led to an eclectic search for tools and methods, which has been deeply informed by monist modes of thinking, which are both inherited from the imperial era well as Marxist-Leninist thinking and practice. However, this has also been supplemented by increased marketization, resulting in an eclectic approach to media governance.”

Speaker’s resume: Dr. Creemers studied Sinology at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, where he also completed a Master in International Relations, after a year in Beijing for language training. He wrote a doctoral dissertation at Maastricht University, in which he explains media piracy in China from the point of view of media control, and assesses the potential impact of international trade law on this phenomenon. In 2012, he joined the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford. He is preparing a new monograph on the development of public communications law in China, with particular attention to the historical and philosophical factors that shaped it.

E-mail: Rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk

Website: http://chinacopyrightandmedia.wordpress.com
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Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog

receive an abstract of each talk one week in advance.

For more information about China-related activities and

lectures atLeidenUniversity, please visit the blog at

http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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CHINA SEMINAR | 25 MARCH 2013 | ZHOU SHUGUANG | HOW MY BLOG CHANGED MY LIFE

How my blog changed my life

Speaker:  Zhou Shuguang (aka. Zola) (blogger, citizen reporter in the PRC)
Date and time:  Monday 25 March, 17.15-19.00
Venue:  Lipsius 002

Language:  Chinese

Information: Zhou Shuguang (aka. Zola) reported local news stories on his blog, with a focus on stories that were not reported in state media. Less than a year after starting the blog, he stopped publication out of concern for his personal safety. In this China Seminar, Zola will talk about his experience as a blogger and citizen reporter, and the problems he faced when “doing journalism outside the system.” More information about Zhou Shuguang’s activities in this article.

He is considered one of China’s two citizen journalists, who both feature in the documentary “High Tech, Low Life”. The documentary is being screened in Den Haag at the Movies that Matter Festival: please visit the website for more information. Zhou Shuguang is visiting the Netherlands to attend the festival as a guest of Movies that Matters and Amnesty International.
——————————————————————-

Subscribers to the RSS feed of the China Seminar blog

receive an abstract of each talk one week in advance.

For more information about China-related activities and

lectures atLeidenUniversity, please visit the blog at

http://chinaleiden.weblog.leidenuniv.nl/

or contact the organizer: Tineke D’Haeseleer

(t.m.v.dhaeseleer@hum.leidenuniv.nl)

 

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20 March: IIAS lunch lecture: Dao/Tao: What? or How?- Dr. Ping Wang

Dao/Tao: What? or How?

In this Lunch Lecture IIAS fellow Dr Ping Wang looks at Dao as refracted through the lenses  provided by Guo Xiang (252? – 312).

“Daoist texts, like Confucian classics, have survived the passage of time not to mention the vicissitudes of recurring social upheaval and changing philosophical fashions over millennia.  Many philosophers and scholars throughout Chinese history have contributed to the dissemination of  Daoist  philosophy.  My current book project is a study of Guo Xiang Commentary to theZhuangzi (Zhuangzi zhu 《庄子注》), the most  influential version of Zhuangzi.  Through the lenses provided by Guo Xiang,  we can see how Daoism, one of the three main strands of thought, have coexisted and grown with Confucianism and Buddhism. This talk, through the examination of Guo’s interpretation of “Dao” and other related concepts in philosophical and historical exegeses, attempts to demonstrate how Guo Xiang sought to synthesize Confucian ethics within the Daoist philosophy.”

Lunch is provided. Please register on the IIAS website